Wooden Nickel

What's New 6-9-23

alt_text
Because Music

The follow-up to 2019’s Redcar…, Paranoïa, Angels, True Love is both more sprawling than Redcar… —twenty tracks spanning nearly ninety minutes—and more unified. Letissier has described it as the second part of an “operatic gesture” inspired by “Angels in America,” and it is structured, somewhat showily, in three movements. But the album feels less like an opera than like the score for a film epic, a patient and pleading unfurling of atmospheric sounds. And though the new album is not a neon-fueled ode to sweating out heartbreak, there is still enough here that might summon one to dance.

alt_text
Thirty Tigers

Weathervanes is a collection of grown-up songs: songs about adult love, about change, about the danger of nostalgia and the interrogation of myths, about cruelty and regret and redemption. Some will make you cry alone in your car and others will make you sing along with thousands of strangers in a big summer pavilion, united in the great miracle of being alive. The record features the rolling thunder of Isbell’s fearsome 400 Unit, who’ve earned a place in the rock ‘n’ roll cosmos alongside the greatest backing ensembles, as powerful and essential to the storytelling as The E Street Band or the Wailers.

alt_text
Fat Possum

This is mutant Americana in a world of love, drugs, storytelling, and miracles--held together by Trevor Powers' voice and an upright piano. In his own words, "It's stories of brothers leaving for war, drunk fathers learning to hug, mothers falling in love, neighbors stealing mail, cowboys doing drugs, friends skipping school, me crying in the bathtub, dogs catching rabbits, and children playing in tall grass."

alt_text
Blue Note

Joy’All finds the singer-songwriter embarking on a new era, in a new town – and on a new label, as she joins the iconic roster of Blue Note/Capitol Records. While Joy’All pulls from a bounty of sonic inspiration – from classic soul to ‘90s R&B, as well as country and classic singer-songwriter records – the album’s rich, intimate and warm live sound is the hallmark of eight-time Grammy-winning producer Dave Cobb.

alt_text
ATO Records

My Morning Jacket, touring behind It Still Moves, took the stage at Bonnaroo on a scorching hot day in the summer of '04. Ominous dark clouds rolled in early in the performance. "I'll never forget it," reflected Jim James "We're playing & the sky just rips open & rain starts pouring down. People are losing their minds... Everybody is petrified that we're going to get electrocuted, but it was such a transcendent moment that we just didn't care." It would become one of the festivals most iconic sets.

alt_text
Nile City Records

Yesterday's News is a record of unhurried meditations delivered by an artist learning to slow down and appreciate the tiny miracles that make life worth living. Hailed by NPR for his “musical daring and impeccable song craft,” and Rolling Stone for his “sharp eye for storytelling,” Ellis recorded to tape in just two days, embracing a raw minimalism that prizes patience and restraint above all else: "close your eyes and drift into a dream."

alt_text
Warp

Teeming with melodic epiphanies and layered sounds, Squid’s second album O Monolith is a musical evocation of environment, domesticity and self-made folklore. It’s dense and tricksy – but also more warm and characterful, with a meandering, questioning nature. It’s a reflection of the outsized progression of a band always looking to the future. Like its namesake, O Monolith is vast and strange; alive with endless possible interpretations of its inner mysteries.

alt_text
Capitol

For the most jovial member of One Direction, it’s touching to hear Horan get so intimate on his own. He brings empathy to power ballads like “Heaven,” addressing twenty-something turmoil while “Science” reaches out to someone struggling with depression. But the emotional highlight is the wonderfully titled love song “You Could Start a Cult,” stripped down to just Niall and his acoustic guitar, as he vows, “I will follow you till there’s no tomorrow.” On The Show, it sounds like Niall Horan knows exactly where he’s going.

alt_text

Pin It
        
back to top