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Eye Of Every Storm

Details

Format: CD
Label: NEUROT RECORDINGS
Catalog: 33
Genre: Rock/Pop
Rel. Date: 06/29/2004
UPC: 658457103326

Eye Of Every Storm
Artist: Neurosis
Format: CD
New: Not Currently Available
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Reviews:

Growing up is never easy. But in the world of extreme metal, facing adulthood can feel damn near impossible. With age and wisdom, we're supposed to smarten up and abandon our beloved noise in favor of more mature music-like, you know, Sting-and leave the crazy sounds to kids barely old enough to drive. For many of us metallic elders, however, Neurosis have been a tremendous source of vindication-an indispensable band who have made some of their most vital and profound extreme music after each member had turned 30.

Still, even Neurosis haven't been spared the ravages of time. Slowly dismantling their powerful arsenal since 1996's landmark Through Silver in Blood, the Oakland sextet has phased out their dynamic aural peaks and valleys, their pummelling tribal rhythms, and Dave Edwardson's subterranean vocals to make room for more delicate melodies. While their previous album, 2001's A Sun That Never Sets, struck the perfect balance between their old and new aesthetics, The Eye of Every Storm commits itself fully to quiet, spatial, introspective, and, above all, boring progressive rock. Considering the band's recent pretentious foray with former Swans vocalist Jarboe (Michael Gira's an adult now too) and the solo LPs from Neurosis frontmen Scott Kelly and Steve Von Till, this shift isn't entirely surprising. That it's been executed without proper direction on the watch of noted audio tyrant Steve Albini is the real shocker. In fact, only standout opener, "Burn," and the marathon "A Season in the Sky" retain that stunning contrast of darkness and light the band first perfected well over a decade ago. And that's enough to make anyone feel old.

"Growing up is never easy. But in the world of extreme metal, facing adulthood can feel damn near impossible. With age and wisdom, we're supposed to smarten up and abandon our beloved noise in favor of more mature music-like, you know, Sting-and leave the crazy sounds to kids barely old enough to drive. For many of us metallic elders, however, Neurosis have been a tremendous source of vindication-an indispensable band who have made some of their most vital and profound extreme music after each member had turned 30.

Still, even Neurosis haven't been spared the ravages of time. Slowly dismantling their powerful arsenal since 1996's landmark Through Silver in Blood, the Oakland sextet has phased out their dynamic aural peaks and valleys, their pummelling tribal rhythms, and Dave Edwardson's subterranean vocals to make room for more delicate melodies. While their previous album, 2001's A Sun That Never Sets, struck the perfect balance between their old and new aesthetics, The Eye of Every Storm commits itself fully to quiet, spatial, introspective, and, above all, boring progressive rock. Considering the band's recent pretentious foray with former Swans vocalist Jarboe (Michael Gira's an adult now too) and the solo LPs from Neurosis frontmen Scott Kelly and Steve Von Till, this shift isn't entirely surprising. That it's been executed without proper direction on the watch of noted audio tyrant Steve Albini is the real shocker. In fact, only standout opener, ""Burn,"" and the marathon ""A Season in the Sky"" retain that stunning contrast of darkness and light the band first perfected well over a decade ago. And that's enough to make anyone feel old.

"